On Thursday, December 15, 2016, Donald Stufft <donald@stufft.io> wrote:

On Dec 15, 2016, at 9:35 AM, Steve Dower <steve.dower@python.org> wrote:

The "curated package sets" on PyPI idea sounds a bit like Steam's curator lists, which I like to think of as Twitter for game reviews. You can follow a curator to see their comments on particular games, and the most popular curators have their comments appear on the actual listings too.

Might be interesting to see how something like that worked for PyPI, though the initial investment is pretty high. (It doesn't solve the coherent bundle problem either, just the discovery of good libraries problem.)


Theoretically we could allow people to not just select packages, but also package specifiers for their “curated package set”, so instead of saying “requests”, you could say “requests~=2.12” or “requests==2.12.2”. If we really wanted to get slick we could even provide a requirements.txt file format, and have people able to install the entire set by doing something like:

    $ pip install -r https://pypi.org/sets/dstufft/my-cool-set/requirements.txt

With version control? 

    $ pip install -r https://pypi.org/sets/dstufft/my-cool-set/abcd123/requirements.txt
 
    $ pip install -r https://pypi.org/sets/dstufft/my-cool-set/v0.0.1/requirements.txt

This would be a graph. JSONLD?
#PEP426JSONLD:
https://www.google.com/search?q=pep426jsonld
https://github.com/pypa/interoperability-peps/issues/31

With JSONLD, we could merge SoftwarePackage metadata with SoftwarePackageCollection metadata (just throwing some types out there).

A http://schema.org/SoftwareApplication is a http://schema.org/CreativeWork .

http://schema.org/softwareVersion





Donald Stufft