Oh, it's definitely too late for 3.10.

On Wed, Jun 23, 2021 at 8:16 PM Jelle Zijlstra <jelle.zijlstra@gmail.com> wrote:


El mié, 23 jun 2021 a las 19:54, Ethan Furman (<ethan@stoneleaf.us>) escribió:
TL;DR  I am considering changing IntEnum and IntFlag's `__str__` to be `int.__str__`

IntEnum and IntFlag are becoming more common in the stdlib.  They currently show up in

* http
* re
* signal
* ssl
* socket

to name just a few.

3.10 already has some changes to the str() and repr() of enums in general:

HTTPStatus ->  OK  and  HTTPStatus.OK  instead of HTTPStatus.OK and <HTTPStatus.OK: 200>


Enum's that are taking the place of global constants have the repr() further modified:

RegexFlag -> ASCII  and  re.ASCII  instead of RegexFlag.ASCII and <RegexFlag.ASCII: 256>


When Enum was first created we also modified the default JSON encoder to be able to encode int- and float-based
enumerations; however, with the continued rise of Python in the world a user stumbled upon a stdlib encoder that we
missed: `urllib.parse.urlencode()` (as seen in issue 33025 [1]).

IIRC enum.IntEnum (and later enum.IntFlag) were introduced so they could be drop-in replacements for existing integer
constants.  At the time I didn't fully appreciate how those constants were used in code with regards to str() -- which
is to say, changing the str() output can be a breaking change, even inside the stdlib.

What I would like to do for the enum module is make any supplied mixed-in enums a little more vanilla:

* str() is the mixed-in `__str__`, not the Enum `__str__`
* format() is the mixed-in `__format__`, not the Enum `__format__` (this is the current effective behavior already)

Other benefits, particularly repr(), would remain.  Note that a mixed enum created by a user would have the normal Enum
`__str__` and `__format__`.


Summary:  mixed enums provided in the enum module should maintain the mixed data types `__str__` and `__format__`.

Thoughts?

This seems like it's going to be a backwards incompatible change that may turn out to be fairly disruptive for the codebase I have to maintain. We use IntEnum heavily and any change in behavior is likely to require migration work. I'm already pretty worried about the other enum changes in 3.10.
 

--
~Ethan~



[1] https://bugs.python.org/issue33025
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