Thanks for following up.

it's the rglob() method. E.g. all paths under /foo/bar should be found as follows:

  for path in pathlib.Path('/foo/bar').rglob('**/*'):
      print(path)

The PermissionError bug you found is already reported: http://bugs.python.org/issue24120 -- it even has  a patch but it's stuck in review.

Thanks for pinging that -- I had somehow assumed that the PermissionError was intentional.

Sadly there's another error: loops introduced by symlinks cause infinite recursion. I filed that here: http://bugs.python.org/issue26012. (The fix should be judicious use of is_symlink(), but the code is a little convoluted.)


Thanks,

-CHB


On Mon, Dec 28, 2015 at 11:25 AM, Chris Barker <chris.barker@noaa.gov> wrote:
On Tue, Dec 22, 2015 at 4:23 PM, Guido van Rossum <guido@python.org> wrote:
The two-level iteration forced upon you by os.walk() is indeed often unnecessary -- but handling dirs and files separately usually makes sense,

indeed, but not always, so a simple API that allows you to get a flat walk would be nice....

Of course for that basic use case, you could just write your own wrapper around os.walk:

sure, but having to write "little" wrappers for common needs is unfortunate...

The problem isn't designing a nice walk API; it's integrating it with pathlib.*

indeed -- I'd really like to see a *walk in pathlib itself. I've been trying to use pathlib whenever I need, well, a path, but then I find I almost immediately need to step out and use an os.path function, and have to string-fy it anyway -- makes me wonder what the point is..

 And honestly, if open, os.walk, etc. aren't going to work with Path objects, 

but they should -- of course they should..... 

Truly pushing for adoption of a new abstraction like this takes many years -- pathlib was new (and provisional) in 3.4 so it really hasn't been long enough to give up on it. The OP hasn't!

it will take many years for sure -- but the standard library cold at least adopt it as much as possible.

Path.walk would be a nice start :-)

My example: one of our sysadmins wanted a little script to go thorugh an entire drive (Windows), and check if any paths were longer than 256 characters (Windows, remember..)

I came up with this:

def get_all_paths(start_dir='/'):
    for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in os.walk(start_dir):
        for filename in filenames:
            yield os.path.join(dirpath, filename)

too_long = []
for p in get_all_paths('/'):
    print("checking:", p)
    if len(p) > 255:
        too_long.append(p)
        print("Path too long!")

way too wordy! 

I started with pathlib, but that just made it worse.

now that I think about it, maybe I could have simpily used pathlib.Path.rglob....

However, when I try that, I get a permission error:

/Users/chris.barker/miniconda2/envs/py3/lib/python3.5/pathlib.py in wrapped(pathobj, *args)

    369         @functools.wraps(strfunc)
    370         def wrapped(pathobj, *args):
--> 371             return strfunc(str(pathobj), *args)
    372         return staticmethod(wrapped)
    373

PermissionError: [Errno 13] Permission denied: '/Users/.chris.barker.xahome/caches/opendirectory'

as the error comes insider the rglob() generator, I'm not sure how to tell it to ignore and move on....

os.walk is somehow able to deal with this.

-CHB

--

Christopher Barker, Ph.D.
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--
--Guido van Rossum (python.org/~guido)