Jeff,<br>I think it is a great idea. We can probably do this as a community effort. I will be interested in following it up. Hopefully this and other python groups may join once we build it up a bit. <br><br>I have been toying with the idea of building a Python Academy as a part of our LearningPoint effort with different levels.
<br><br>The idea is to move people from low level to high level by actually writing code and building projects and not just answering questions. Every project that is built will become open source and may benefit the community. I jotted down some ideas here. 
<br><br><a href="http://dorai.wordpress.com/learningpoint/">http://dorai.wordpress.com/learningpoint/</a><br><br>The effort is meant to bootstrap. The people at the high level can mentor students at the low level. <br><br>
Dorai<br><a href="http://www.thodla.com">www.thodla.com</a><br><br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 10/24/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Jeff Rush</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:jeff@taupro.com">jeff@taupro.com</a>&gt; wrote:
</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">Dorai Thodla wrote:<br>&gt; Anand,<br>&gt; You make some good points. I have had similar experience to the one you
<br>&gt; describe with certified Java and .NET progammers too.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; It may be interesting to find out what <a href="http://python.org">python.org</a> &lt;<a href="http://python.org">http://python.org</a>&gt;<br>
&gt; thinks about certification.<br><br>Hi Dorai.&nbsp;&nbsp;As far as I know, in my role as former Python Advocacy Coordinator,<br>there are no Python certifications anywhere.&nbsp;&nbsp;Sometimes there is talk that we<br>ought to have them, but a large number of people are against the idea.&nbsp;&nbsp; Not
<br>that that would matter, in that any group of people could start it moving, and<br>those who like the idea would use it and those who don&#39;t can ignore it.<br><br>I personally have an interest, not in formal certification which relies upon
<br>the reputation of some evaluation company, but in what I call my &quot;So you think<br>you know Python...&quot; project.&nbsp;&nbsp;The idea would be to have a website where people<br>can go to test themselves, with links to learning material that fill in the
<br>gaps identified in their knowledge.&nbsp;&nbsp;The questions would not be fixed but<br>dynamically generated, so that a person cannot just memorize the answers.&nbsp;&nbsp;And<br>if desired an employer could sit an interviewee down in front of a PC and have
<br>him complete the test in front of him.<br><br>No such system is perfect but it would give a starting point for measuring the<br>capabilities of a Python programmer.&nbsp;&nbsp;I don&#39;t look at it as some enforcement<br>measure for catching pretenders, like most certification does, but rather for
<br>helping those medium-level programmers who have learned enough Python to get<br>along but don&#39;t know what they don&#39;t know and could use pointers to advanced<br>lessons.&nbsp;&nbsp;The idea is to help create better Python programmers, in an
<br>non-corporate, opensource manner.<br><br>I hope some year to show something like this off at PyCon but currently lack<br>the time to implement it myself.<br><br>-Jeff<br><br>_______________________________________________
<br>BangPypers mailing list<br><a href="mailto:BangPypers@python.org">BangPypers@python.org</a><br><a href="http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/bangpypers">http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/bangpypers</a><br></blockquote>
</div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Dorai Thodla (<a href="http://www.thodla.com">http://www.thodla.com</a>)<br>Tracking Web Trends