<div class="gmail_quote"><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-size-adjust: inherit; font-stretch: inherit;" valign="top">
<br><div><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">Since 80s to late 90s&nbsp;many Indian/foreign(US etc) have been teaching programming in C/C++.When I talked to 2 ex-professors in India,they observed that the rigor when&nbsp;students go through using c/++ is higher than java/python.For.e.g.manipulation of linked list,hash table.<br>
</blockquote><br>Can you define &#39;rigor&#39;? If you mean, number of hours spent, I agree with you but that&#39;s not a very good metric. <br><br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">
IMO better programming is not just understaning the layers of abstraction but understanding some intracacies,what goes below the hood.</blockquote></div></td></tr></tbody></table></div><br>Yes and this is served better by actually studying the intricacies rather than language implementation details. Worrying about things like memory allocation/deallocation, corrupt pointers etc. are fine if that&#39;s what you want to do but if you&#39;re trying to implement a complex data structure and spend your time hunting for a bad pointer, it&#39;s a waste of time. <br>
<br clear="all"><br>-- <br>~noufal<br><br>