<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Oct 12, 2009 at 1:14 PM, Navin Kabra <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:navin.kabra@gmail.com">navin.kabra@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">

<br><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im">On Mon, Oct 12, 2009 at 12:49 PM, Gopinath R <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:gopiindian86@gmail.com" target="_blank">gopiindian86@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br></div>
<div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
I am a newbie to python. i like to learn python strongly. which version is recommended to start with 2.6 or 3.0.
<div>I believe 3.0 has lot more features added, there is no backward compatibility in that. we cannot use some of the 2.6 syntaxes in that. for Example: raw_input. it worries me a lot. pls give some suggestion.</div></blockquote>


</div><div><br>I think one of the important features of python is the availability of a huge set of external libraries that make your programming easier (because you can reuse stuff, and not reinvent the wheel). This is true of python 2.6, but not yet true of python 3.x. So, assuming that you would like to make something useful with python (as opposed to toy programs), go with 2.6. </div>

</div></blockquote><div><br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>I can&#39;t think of a strong reason for <br>


</div></div></blockquote><div><br><br>Sorry. This should have been &quot;I can&#39;t think of a strong reason for learning 3.x at this point of time&quot;<br><br> <br></div></div>