<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><div style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; ">On Nov 19, 2012, at 5:40 PM, <a href="mailto:martin@v.loewis.de">martin@v.loewis.de</a> wrote:</div><div style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; "><br></div><blockquote type="cite" style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; "><div><span></span><br><span>Zitat von Daniel Holth <<a href="mailto:dholth@gmail.com">dholth@gmail.com</a>>:</span><br><span></span><br><blockquote type="cite"><span>Unfortunately the whole signed mirror system falls down because it relies</span><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><span>on md5 hashes (<a href="http://www.kb.cert.org/vuls/id/836068">http://www.kb.cert.org/vuls/id/836068</a>) although the signing</span><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><span>key seems to be long enough.</span><br></blockquote><span></span><br><span>You are misinterpreting the vulnerability. It does not apply to the</span><br><span>way in which md5 is used in PyPI.</span><br><span></span><br><span>So in no way the system "falls down".</span><br><span></span><br><span>Regards,</span><br><span>Martin</span><br></div></blockquote><div style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; "><br></div><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto;"><div>I can't create two colliding uploads, uploading the first (harmless version) to pypi and then tricking someone into mirroring the second (harmful) version? The system is not designed to protect the uploaded contents at all?</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps it doesn't fall down for some reason, but the cert recommendation is:</div></span><div><div style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; "><br></div><div><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><b style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; ">Do not use the MD5 algorithm</b><br>Software developers, Certification Authorities, website owners, and users should avoid using the MD5 algorithm in any capacity. As previous research has demonstrated, it should be considered cryptographically broken and unsuitable for further use.<br></span></div><div><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></div><div><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);"><br></span></div><div><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0);">So why not start using sha256? The site would appear more modern, and at the very least people like me would stop complaining about it.</span></div></div></body></html>