<div dir="ltr">Eric,<div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Sep 8, 2015 at 8:57 PM, Eric Miller <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:miller.eric.t@gmail.com" target="_blank">miller.eric.t@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">the "amount of change" problem seems to be the lowest hanging fruit.  Something like:</span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">- identify an x/y mask that defines the largest rectangular area that is 100% sky.  This prevents unwanted changes in light over time on non sky objects (trees/buildings/etc) from contributing noise to the amount of change calculation.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">- using PIL or similar, iterate over every pixel in the mask, avg them out, and build a dict of frame #'s to RGB avgs: </span><span style="font-size:12.8px">{ '0001' : [10,20,30], '0002' : [20,30,40] }.</span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">- compare avg RGB vals for first and last frames to establish start and end RGB values. (or skip this and use absolute 0,0,0 = 0%,  255,255,255 = 100%)</span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">- compare avg RGB vals for each frame to the one previous, to establish % change (relative to total determined in previous step)</span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px"><br></span></div><div><span style="font-size:12.8px">wait a minute...didn't you do this already? Like exactly this, lol?</span></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Thanks for the great ideas... I am doing similar, in that I'm stacking images using pillow's lighter() and darker() methods, but not trying to quantify a change. I know that there is a method to generate an image difference, specifically ImageChops.difference(), but that results in another image. I was wanting to somehow quantify that into a number so I can determine if there is "a lot" or "a little" change between images.</div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,<br>Eric</div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div></div>