<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Jan 11, 2017, at 7:40 PM, Nick Coghlan <<a href="mailto:ncoghlan@gmail.com" class="">ncoghlan@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class=""><div class="">On 12 January 2017 at 13:00, Donald Stufft <<a href="mailto:donald@stufft.io" class="">donald@stufft.io</a>> wrote:<br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class="">This doesn’t work well because it’s not something that pip is going to be<br class="">able to upgrade on Windows, because the .so will be locked when pip imports<br class="">it on Windows and we won’t be able to uninstall it to do an upgrade. We had<br class="">to disable the automatic use of pyOpenSSL for this reason too. The only C<br class="">stuff that pip can reliably use is the standard library.<br class=""></blockquote><br class="">Ugh, I'd completely forgotten about that limitation of Windows filesystems.<br class=""><br class="">And the main alternatives I can think of involve copying files around<br class="">as pip starts up, which would be unacceptably slow for a command line<br class="">app :(<br class=""></div></div></blockquote></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">It's possible for Pip to notice that it wants to replace a particular file; you can "unlock" it by moving it aside.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><a href="https://serverfault.com/a/503769" class="">https://serverfault.com/a/503769</a></div><br class=""><div class="">-glyph</div></body></html>