<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 9 September 2014 13:45, Rejy M Cyriac <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rcyriac@redhat.com" target="_blank">rcyriac@redhat.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div id=":8e0" class="a3s" style="overflow:hidden">> US PyCon 2014 has some good sections on Open Spaces[1]. We could borrow<br>
> some ideas from here.<br>
><br>
> As for lighting talks, it looks like they went through an approval<br>
> process as well. I found a section[2] of "accepted lighting talks" on<br>
> their site.<br>
><br>
> [1]: <a href="https://us.pycon.org/2014/community/openspaces/" target="_blank">https://us.pycon.org/2014/community/openspaces/</a><br>
> [2]: <a href="https://us.pycon.org/2014/schedule/lightning-talks/list/" target="_blank">https://us.pycon.org/2014/schedule/lightning-talks/list/</a><br>
><br>
<br>
Having an approval process is good to ensure that the topics are<br>
relevant for the conference. But the approval process would have to be<br>
lightning quick, for the attendees to get enough time to vote on the<br>
approved list. So the approvers have to be selected ahead, and be ready<br>
to review as the proposals come i</div></blockquote></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div>Would prefer keeping it open and let it become a platform for budding speakers to talk to crowd. At max people will end up tolerating someone for 5 minutes.</div><div class="gmail_extra">- sree<br><br><div dir="ltr"><br></div>
</div></div>