<div dir="ltr">If I may suggest too, please use header cell instead of hash in markdown. Header cell are used for section when converting to latex and do automatically generate anchors on nbviewer/html so that you can link to subpart:<div>
<br></div><div>Example :</div><div><a href="http://nbviewer.ipython.org/url/jdj.mit.edu/~stevenj/IJulia%20Preview.ipynb#Multimedia-display-in-IJulia">http://nbviewer.ipython.org/url/jdj.mit.edu/~stevenj/IJulia%20Preview.ipynb#Multimedia-display-in-IJulia</a></div>
</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jul 29, 2014 at 11:16 PM, Matthew Brett <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:matthew.brett@gmail.com" target="_blank">matthew.brett@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi,<br>
<div class=""><br>
On Tue, Jul 29, 2014 at 4:50 PM, Mark Bakker <<a href="mailto:markbak@gmail.com">markbak@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
</div><div><div class="h5">> We have developed a series of 15 Notebooks for scientists and engineers who<br>
> want to use Python programming for exploratory computing, scipting, data<br>
> analysis, and visualization. No prior knowledge of computer programming is<br>
> assumed. Each Notebook covers a specific topic and includes a number of<br>
> exercises. The exercises should take less than 4 hours to complete for each<br>
> Notebook.<br>
><br>
> We have developed these Notebooks for an undergraduate class (sophomores) in<br>
> Civil Engineering. A short survey of the students taking the class (~270 of<br>
> them) showed that the students really liked the class and learned a lot.<br>
><br>
> The Notebooks may be viewed at<br>
> <a href="http://mbakker7.github.io/exploratory_computing_with_python/" target="_blank">http://mbakker7.github.io/exploratory_computing_with_python/</a><br>
> A link to the GitHub repository is also shown on this page.<br>
<br>
</div></div>Thanks a lot for this.   From our feedback, our students liked the<br>
notebooks too - e.g.<br>
<br>
"I appreciate the downloadable iPython notebooks with explanations of<br>
what the code is and does - will be a great reference"<br>
<br>
I think there's really no question that the notebooks make running<br>
code examples easier and clearer for the teacher and the student.  And<br>
they are indeed a great reference.   The question always is - what do<br>
we want to teach?  In some cases it's probably enough that the<br>
students get the idea, and running / writing code in the notebooks<br>
helps them get the idea.   But the students also implicitly learn that<br>
this is the standard way of working with code, and I personally don't<br>
think we should be teaching that.  So, for me at least, I am trying to<br>
find a way to strike a balance between the ease of writing materials /<br>
ease of getting students running code, and the need for teaching solid<br>
working practice. For example, for the next iteration of our course,<br>
I'm thinking of doing a flipped classroom format, with the tutorials<br>
mostly in IPython notebooks, but doing the exercises in class using<br>
text editor and terminal and git.  I'd also like to try and teach the<br>
IPython notebook as a great tool for sharing and explaining a<br>
workflow, or developing a tutorial.<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
<br>
Matthew<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
IPython-User mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:IPython-User@scipy.org">IPython-User@scipy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user" target="_blank">http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>