<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><span><br>
</span>I suppose you should display it in an iframe, if you display the SVG with the isolated=true metadata,<br>
IPython should do that for you automatically.<br>
<span><br></span></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Thanks, this was a fairly easy modification to the magic</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><span>
<br>
> On a related point, is there an easy way to export the .svg output of a cell to a file directly from within the notebook? I know that I could use nbconvert, manually hack the html, or find the temporary svg created by the magic, but I was hoping to find a more convenient way.<br>
<br>
</span>No, no easy way. For most content, drag-and drop from Chrome to my desktop seem to work here.<br>
I was able to do it with SVG at some point, but today it refuses.<br>
--<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That's a pity, it would be nice to have a general solution to this problem for arbitrary data displayed in the cell output. Perhaps some kind of widget which runs nbconvert and selects the output from one cell would be a solution. For this specific tikz magic, the easiest thing was to add an extra argument to save a copy of the file.</div><div><br></div><div>Anyway, I have created a modified version of this tikz magic with these two fixes, shared here in case it is useful to anybody else:</div><div><br></div><div><a href="https://gist.github.com/DavidPowell/84655e9a87fdfdaf2717">https://gist.github.com/DavidPowell/84655e9a87fdfdaf2717</a><br></div><div><br></div><div> </div></div></div></div>