Sorry, the &quot;same output as below&quot; refers to,<br><br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">Setting configuration<br>&lt;hello-world xmlns:clitype=&quot;
<a href="http://saxon.sf.net/clitype">http://saxon.sf.net/clitype</a>&quot;&gt;&lt;output&gt;1.4142135623730<br>951&lt;/output&gt;&lt;/hello-world&gt;<br>None<br></blockquote><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 9/14/06, 
<b class="gmail_sendername">M. David Peterson</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:xmlhacker@gmail.com">xmlhacker@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>Hey All,<br><br>If you access &gt; <a href="http://pypod.net/console/index.html" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">http://pypod.net/console/index.html
</a>
&lt; inside of Internet Explorer, click &quot;Install&quot;, and as long as the
application installs correctly (it should -- I've verified as such on
several machines -- but you never know until you know ;), at the
prompt, type,
<br><br>&gt;&gt;&gt; import test.extf_test<br><br>After some churning
should produce the same output as below. [you may need to first give
the application permission to access the internet and then run the
script again.]
<br><br>Obviously this is nothing all that exciting, but the xml [<a href="http://xslt.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Modules/DataFilter/init.xml" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">
http://xslt.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/Modules/DataFilter/init.xml</a>] and xslt [<a href="http://xslt.googlecode.com/svn/test/extensionfunction.xsl" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">http://xslt.googlecode.com/svn/test/extensionfunction.xsl
</a>]
files that are being processed are accessed via HTTP from the GoogleCode XSLT
project repository, so with a few more pieces of code, the ability to
check files into a repository to then point people at them for testing should be pretty straight forward.&nbsp; While it will take a bit more code, by adding an APP-enabled server to the mix, the ability to create an Atom feed that lists all of the Python modules, and/or XML/XSLT files if you're an XSLT developer, that are a part of a given package should then allow nicely to access this Atom feed, import the modules and/or xml/xslt files, to then run them locally should act nicely in regards to being able to point people to one Atom feed in which contains links to all of the code necessary to run any given application.
<br><br>NOTE: This also has all of the Mvp.Xml libraries so testing on a variety of engines is possible as well.<br><br>I'll be putting this into more of a demoable format and posting this to my XML.com blog later today.&nbsp; But now that all of the pieces are in place this should allow nicely for some pretty cool things.
<br><br>Enjoy! :)<br clear="all"></div><div><span class="sg"><br>-- <br>/M:D<br><br>M. David Peterson<br><a href="http://mdavid.name" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">http://mdavid.name
</a> | <a href="http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/au/2354" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/au/2354</a>

</span></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>/M:D<br><br>M. David Peterson<br><a href="http://mdavid.name">http://mdavid.name</a> | <a href="http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/au/2354">http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/au/2354
</a>