[Numpy-discussion] distributing wheels & SSE/superpack options

Ralf Gommers ralf.gommers at gmail.com
Sat Dec 7 07:09:17 EST 2013


On Sat, Dec 7, 2013 at 7:44 AM, Chris Barker <chris.barker at noaa.gov> wrote:

> On Fri, Dec 6, 2013 at 10:06 AM, Ralf Gommers <ralf.gommers at gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> One of the things that we should start doing for numpy is distribute
>> releases as wheels. On OS X at least this is quite simple, so I propose to
>> just experiment with it.
>>
>
> OK -- maybe on the wrong list, but an itch of mine is OSX binaries of
> IPython (and the dependencies required for the notebook, too. There is
> right no way for an OS_X user without the compiler setup to get iPython
> without going to Anaconda or Canopy,
>
> Yet it's a really great tool for newbies....
>
> So I just sat down and did a simple:
>
> pip wheel --wheel-dir=wheelhouse2 ipython[all]
>
> Wow -- took a little while, but presto!  A pile of wheels, ready to go:
>
> $ ls wheelhouse/
> Jinja2-2.7.1-py27-none-any.whl
> pyzmq-14.0.1-cp27-none-macosx_10_6_intel.whl
> MarkupSafe-0.18-cp27-none-macosx_10_6_intel.whl
> readline-6.2.4.1-cp27-none-macosx_10_6_intel.whl
> Pygments-1.6-py27-none-any.whl
> tornado-3.1.1-py27-none-any.whl
> ipython-1.1.0-py27-none-any.whl
>
>
> Now, do they work? They do on my machine. Is there somewhere I could put
> them up so folks could test?
>

You can't upload that whole stack anywhere pip finds it automatically.
Temporarily you can put them on SourceForge or on any public download site.
Then people can download and install with wheel. If you send me a link to
those files, then I'll put them up together with the numpy wheels on SF.

Ralf


>
>  -Chris
>
>
>
>
>
>
> I can create some to try out and put them on a separate folder on
>> SourceForge. If that works they can be put on PyPi.
>>
>> For Windows things are less simple, because the wheel format doesn't
>> handle the multiple builds (no SSE, SSE2, SSE3) that are in the superpack
>> installers. A problem is that we don't really know how many users still
>> have old CPUs that don't support SSE3. The impact for those users is high,
>> numpy will install but crash (see
>> https://github.com/scipy/scipy/issues/1697). Questions:
>> 1. does anyone have a good idea to obtain statistics?
>> 2. in the absence of statistics, can we do an experiment by putting one
>> wheel up on PyPi which contains SSE3 instructions, for python 3.3 I
>> propose, and seeing for how many (if any) users this goes wrong?
>>
>> Ralf
>>
>> P.S. related question: did anyone check whether the recently merged
>> NPY_HAVE_SSE2_INTRINSIC puts SSE2 instructions into the no-SSE binary?
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> NumPy-Discussion mailing list
>> NumPy-Discussion at scipy.org
>> http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Christopher Barker, Ph.D.
> Oceanographer
>
> Emergency Response Division
> NOAA/NOS/OR&R            (206) 526-6959   voice
> 7600 Sand Point Way NE   (206) 526-6329   fax
> Seattle, WA  98115       (206) 526-6317   main reception
>
> Chris.Barker at noaa.gov
>
> _______________________________________________
> NumPy-Discussion mailing list
> NumPy-Discussion at scipy.org
> http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://mail.python.org/pipermail/numpy-discussion/attachments/20131207/9f6c68ef/attachment.html>


More information about the NumPy-Discussion mailing list