[Numpy-discussion] numpy pprint?

Mark Harfouche mark.harfouche at gmail.com
Tue Nov 6 05:41:20 EST 2018


To install spyder I wonder if Anaconda is a possibility.

It also installs a lot of packages that your pupils/peers might be using
but that you might not anticipate.

On a semi-related note, a recent change to the repr broke a lot of
downstream tests. Htlm and latex reprs are probably easier to experiment
with on that sense.

That said. That might just be a doctest issue and not a numpy issue.

On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 5:18 AM Foad Sojoodi Farimani <f.s.farimani at gmail.com>
wrote:

> In between your lines:
>
> On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 11:07 AM Mark Harfouche <mark.harfouche at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Foad,
>> In response to:
>>
>> Thanks but I know it is very bad:
>>
>>    - it does not work properly for floats
>>    - it only works for 1D and 2D
>>    - there can be some recursive function I believe.
>>
>> I think this is the awesome part about being able to write 10 lines of
>> code that are specified to representing exactly 1 thing.
>>
>> Other than that, yeah, encouraging people to transition from matlab is
>> challenging. Matlab is definitely good at doing matrix operations. Python3
>> somewhat helps in that regard.
>>
>> I'm super glad you are bringing usability issues up and working toward
>> solving them.
>>
>> Maybe you can describe the interface for python you find practical to
>> introduce to newcomers so as to motivate the discussion?
>>
>
> I have been thinking about Spyder but it has a lot of issues with the
> standard python distribution and pip. Jupyterlab would be awesome except
> some Jupyter Notebook extensions are missing. For example variable
> inspector, RISE for slides, Hinterland, ... For the moment Jupyter Notebook
> is the most reliable/complete I could find.
>
> F.
>
>
>>
>> Mark
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 3:57 AM Foad Sojoodi Farimani <
>> f.s.farimani at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Wow, this is awesome.
>>> Some points though:
>>>
>>>    - not everybody uses IPython/Jupyter having the functionality for
>>>    conventional consols would also help. something like
>>>    Sypy's init_printing/init_session which smartly chooses the right
>>>    representation considering the terminal.
>>>    - I don't think putting everything in boxes is helping. it is
>>>    confusing. I would rather having horizontal and vertical square brackets
>>>    represent each nested array
>>>    - it would be awesome if in IPython/Jupyter hovering over an element
>>>    a popup would show the index
>>>    - one could read the width and height of the terminal and other
>>>    options I mentioned in reply Mark to show L R U P or combination of these
>>>    plus some numbers (similar to Pandas .head .tail) methods and then show the
>>>    rest by unicod 3dot
>>>
>>> P.S. I had no idea our university Microsoft services also offers Azure
>>> Notebooks awesome :P
>>>
>>> F.
>>>
>>> On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 9:45 AM Eric Wieser <wieser.eric+numpy at gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Here's how that could look
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> https://numpyintegration-ericwieser.notebooks.azure.com/j/notebooks/pprint.ipynb
>>>>
>>>> Feel free to play around and see if you can produce something more
>>>> useful
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 at 23:28 Foad Sojoodi Farimani <
>>>> f.s.farimani at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> It is not highking if I asked for it :))
>>>>> for IPython/Jupyter using Markdown/LaTeX would be awesome
>>>>> or even better using HTML to add sliders just like Pandas...
>>>>>
>>>>> F.
>>>>>
>>>>> On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 6:51 AM Eric Wieser <
>>>>> wieser.eric+numpy at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Hijacking this thread while on the topic of pprint - we might want to
>>>>>> look into a table-based `_html_repr_` or `_latex_repr_` for use in ipython
>>>>>> - where we can print the full array and let scrollbars replace ellipses.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Eric
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Mon, 5 Nov 2018 at 21:11 Mark Harfouche <mark.harfouche at gmail.com>
>>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Foad,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Visualizing data is definitely a complex field. I definitely feel
>>>>>>> your pain.
>>>>>>> Printing your data is but one way of visualizing it, and probably
>>>>>>> only useful for very small and constrained datasets.
>>>>>>> Have you looked into set_printoptions
>>>>>>> <https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-1.15.1/reference/generated/numpy.set_printoptions.html>
>>>>>>> to see how numpy’s existing capabilities might help you with your
>>>>>>> visualization?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The code you showed seems quite good. I wouldn’t worry about
>>>>>>> performance when it comes to functions that will seldom be called in tight
>>>>>>> loops.
>>>>>>> As you’ll learn more about python and numpy, you’ll keep expanding
>>>>>>> it to include more use cases.
>>>>>>> For many of my projects, I create small submodules for visualization
>>>>>>> tailored to the specific needs of the particular project.
>>>>>>> I’ll try to incorporate your functions and see how I use them.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Your original post seems to have some confusion about C Style vs F
>>>>>>> Style ordering. I hope that has been resolved.
>>>>>>> There is also a lot of good documentation
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/user/numpy-for-matlab-users.html#numpy-for-matlab-users-notes
>>>>>>> about transitioning from matlab.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Mark
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On Mon, Nov 5, 2018 at 4:46 PM Foad Sojoodi Farimani <
>>>>>>> f.s.farimani at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Hello everyone,
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Following this question
>>>>>>>> <https://stackoverflow.com/q/53126305/4999991>, I'm convinced that
>>>>>>>> numpy ndarrays are not MATLAB/mathematical multidimentional matrices and I
>>>>>>>> should stop expecting them to be. However I still think it would have a lot
>>>>>>>> of benefit to have a function like sympy's pprint to pretty print.
>>>>>>>> something like pandas .head and .tail method plus  .left .right .UpLeft
>>>>>>>> .UpRight .DownLeft .DownRight methods. when nothing mentioned it would show
>>>>>>>> 4 corners and put dots in the middle if the array is to big for the
>>>>>>>> terminal.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Best,
>>>>>>>> Foad
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