<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 6/23/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">rex</b> <<a href="mailto:rex@nosyntax.com">rex@nosyntax.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Stefan van der Walt <<a href="mailto:stefan@sun.ac.za">stefan@sun.ac.za</a>> [2007-06-23 15:06]:<br>><br>> On Sat, Jun 23, 2007 at 07:35:35PM +0000, John Ollinger wrote:<br>> ><br>> > I have just been updating our version of Python, numpy and scipy and have run
<br>> > into a floating point exception that crashes Python when I test the release.<br>> ></blockquote><div><br>What do you mean by crash? Is anything printed? Do older versions of numpy still work?<br></div>
<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">> > I am running gcc 3.3.1 on SuSe Linux 2.4.21-144-smp4G.  The error first occurred
<br>> > with numpy-1.0.3.  I downloaded svn 3875 when I then read the scipy web page and<br>> > installed the latest subversion. The test command I am using is<br>> ><br>> > python -c 'import numpy; 
numpy.test(level=1,verbosity==2)'<br>> ><br>> > and occurs during the matvec test.  This test uses rand to generate<br>> > 10x8 and 8x1<br>><br>> It may be worth checking whether the new version of numpy is picked
<br>> up.  You can do that using<br>><br>> import numpy as N<br>> print N.__version__<br>><br>> We have a build slave with a very similar setup to yours (see<br>> <a href="http://buildbot.scipy.org">http://buildbot.scipy.org
</a>) and everything seems to be fine.<br><br>It's somewhat different:<br>SUSE 10.2<br>Core 2 Duo 32-bit<br>Kernel 2.6.18.2-34-default<br>gcc version 4.1.2 20061115 (prerelease) (SUSE Linux)<br>Python 2.5 (r25:51908, Nov 27 2006
<br>print N.__version__<br>1.0.4.dev3868<br>python -c 'import numpy; numpy.test(level=1,verbosity=2)'<br>[...]<br>Ran 590 tests in 0.473s</blockquote><div><br>Do you use Atlas? If so, did you compile it yourself or did you use a package? There is a bug in some older 64 bit Atlas packages running on newer intel hardware that generates illegal instruction exceptions and I am wondering if you may have found a new 32 bit bug. One way to check this is to multiply two big matrices together. There are many paths through Atlas, so the known bug is not encountered in all matrix multiplications, and perhaps not for all floating values either.
<br><br>Chuck<br></div><br></div><br>