<div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">> If what you want is to provide a view  from your C++ matrix, this is<br>> different. You must either :
<br>> - propose the array interface<br>> - use a Python object inside your C++ matrix (this is to be done, I've a<br>> basic example in my blog)<br></blockquote></div><br>Of course : <a href="http://matt.eifelle.com/item/5">
http://matt.eifelle.com/item/5</a><br>It's a basic version of the wrapper I use in my lab (pay attention to the constructor for instance), I hope you will be able to do something alike for your library. If it's not the case, you will have to fall back to the numpy way : allocating a new array, giving a pointer to the array, using it and stop using it after the function call is finished (with the wrapper I propose, you have the array for the life-time of your matrix instead).
<br clear="all"><br>Matthieu<br>-- <br>French PhD student<br>Website : <a href="http://miles.developpez.com/">http://miles.developpez.com/</a><br>Blogs : <a href="http://matt.eifelle.com">http://matt.eifelle.com</a> and <a href="http://blog.developpez.com/?blog=92">
http://blog.developpez.com/?blog=92</a><br>LinkedIn : <a href="http://www.linkedin.com/in/matthieubrucher">http://www.linkedin.com/in/matthieubrucher</a>