<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 2:51 AM, Xavier Barthelemy <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:xabart@gmail.com">xabart@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div>ok let me be more precise<br></div><div><br></div><div>I have an Z array which is the elevation</div><div>from this I extract a discrete array of Zero Crossing, and another discrete array of Crests.</div><div>len(crest) is different than len(Xzeros). I have a threshold method to detect my "valid" crests, and sometimes there are 2 crests between two zero-crossing (grouping effect)</div>

<div><br></div><div>Crest and Zeros are 2 different arrays, with positions. example: Zeros=[1,2,3,4] Arrays=[1.5,1.7,3.5]</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>and yes arrays can be sorted. not a problm with this.</div>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">
<div><br></div><div>Xavier</div></font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div>I may be oversimplifying this, but does searchsorted do what you want?<br><br>In [314]: xzeros=[1,2,3,4]; xcrests=[1.5,1.7,3.5]<br>
<br>In [315]: np.searchsorted(xzeros, xcrests)<br>Out[315]: array([1, 1, 3])<br><br> This returns the indexes of xzeros to the left of xcrests.<br><br>-Tony<br></div></div>