2012/12/13 Chris Barker - NOAA Federal <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:chris.barker@noaa.gov" target="_blank">chris.barker@noaa.gov</a>></span><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">On Thu, Dec 13, 2012 at 3:01 PM, Bradley M. Froehle<br>
<<a href="mailto:brad.froehle@gmail.com">brad.froehle@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Yes, but the point was that since you can live with an older version on<br>
> Python you can probably live with an older version of NumPy.<br>
<br>
</div>exactly -- also:<br>
<br>
How likely are you to nee the latest and greatest numpy but not a new<br>
PyGTK, or a new name_your_package_here. And, in fact, other packages<br>
drop support for older Python's too.<br>
<br>
However, what I can imagine is pretty irrelevant -- sorry I brought it<br>
up -- either there are a significant number of folks for whom support<br>
for old Pythons in important, or there aren't.<span class="HOEnZb"></span><br></blockquote><div><br>I doubt it's a common situation, but just to give an example: I am developing some machine learning code that heavily relies on Numpy, and it is meant to run into a large Python 2.4 software environment, which can't easily be upgraded because it contains lots of libraries that have been built against Python 2.4. And even if I could rebuild it, they wouldn't let me ;) This Python code is mostly proprietary and doesn't require external dependencies to be upgraded... except my little module that may take advantage of Numpy improvements.<br>
<br>-=- Olivier<br> <br></div></div>