<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 10:46 AM, Todd <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:toddrjen@gmail.com" target="_blank">toddrjen@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">

<div dir="ltr"><div><div>x,i=numpy.unique(y, return_inverse=True)<br></div></div>f=[numpy.where(i==ind) for ind in range(len(x))]<br><div><div><div><br></div><br></div></div></div></blockquote></div><br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">

A better version would be (np.where returns tuples, but we don't want tuples):<br><br>x,i=numpy.unique(y, return_inverse=True)<br>f=[numpy.where(i==ind)[0] for ind in range(len(x))]<br><br>You can also do it this way, but it is much harder to read IMO:<br>

<br>x=numpy.unique(y)<br>f=numpy.split(numpy.argsort(y), numpy.nonzero(numpy.diff(numpy.sort(y)))[0]+1)<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">This version figures out the indexes needed to put the values of y in sorted order (the same order x uses), then splits it into sub-arrays based on value.  The principle is simpler but the implementation looks like clear to me.<br>

<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Note that these are only guaranteed to work on 1D arrays, I have not tested them on multidimensional arrays<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div></div>