<p dir="ltr">On 8 Sep 2014 10:42, "Sturla Molden" <<a href="mailto:sturla.molden@gmail.com">sturla.molden@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> Stefan Otte <<a href="mailto:stefan.otte@gmail.com">stefan.otte@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> >     stack([[a, b], [c, d]])<br>
> ><br>
> > In my case `stack` replaced `hstack` and `vstack` almost completely.<br>
> ><br>
> > If you're interested in including it in numpy I created a pull request<br>
> > [1]. I'm looking forward to getting some feedback!<br>
><br>
> As far as I can see, it uses hstack and vstack. But that means a and b have<br>
> to have the same number of rows, c and d must have the same rumber of rows,<br>
> and hstack((a,b)) and hstack((c,d)) must have the same number of columns.<br>
><br>
> Thus it requires a regularity like this:<br>
><br>
> AAAABB<br>
> AAAABB<br>
> CCCDDD<br>
> CCCDDD<br>
> CCCDDD<br>
> CCCDDD<br>
><br>
> What if we just ignore this constraint, and only require the output to be<br>
> rectangular? Now we have a 'tetris game':<br>
><br>
> AAAABB<br>
> AAAABB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
> CCCCDD<br>
> CCCCDD<br>
><br>
> or<br>
><br>
> AAAABB<br>
> AAAABB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
> CCCCBB<br>
><br>
> This should be 'stackable', yes? Or perhaps we need another stacking<br>
> function for this, say numpy.tetris?</p>
<p dir="ltr">It's not at all obvious to me how to describe such "tetris" configurations, or interpret then unambiguously. Do you have a more detailed specification in mind?</p>
<p dir="ltr">> And while we're at it, what about higher dimensions? should there be an<br>
> ndstack function too?</p>
<p dir="ltr">Same comment here.</p>
<p dir="ltr">-n</p>