This is an interesting idea, but I don't understand the use cases for this function. In particular, what would you use n-th order ratios for?<br><br>One use case I can think of is estimating the slope of a log-scaled plot. But here exp(diff(log(x))) is an easy substitute.<br><br>I guess ratio() would work in cases where values are both positive and negative, but again I don't know when that would be useful. If your signal crosses zero, ratios are likely to diverge.<br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, Jul 28, 2017 at 3:25 PM Joseph Fox-Rabinovitz <<a href="mailto:jfoxrabinovitz@gmail.com">jfoxrabinovitz@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><div>I have created PR#9481 to introduce a `ratio` function that behaves very similarly to `diff`, except that it divides successive elements instead of subtracting them. It has some handling built in for zero division, as well as the ability to select between `/` and `//` operators.<br><br></div>There is currently no masked version. Perhaps someone could suggest a simple mechanism for hooking np.ma.true_divide and np.ma.floor_divide in as the operators instead of the regular np.* versions.<br><br></div><div>Please let me know your thoughts.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Regards,<br></div><div><br></div>    -Joe<br></div>
_______________________________________________<br>
NumPy-Discussion mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:NumPy-Discussion@python.org" target="_blank">NumPy-Discussion@python.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion</a><br>
</blockquote></div>