<div dir="ltr">

<div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div>



<div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Interesting,  I wasn't aware that both conventions were widely used.</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Speaking of series with inverse powers (i.e. Laurent series), I wonder how useful it would be to create a class to represent expressions with integral powers from -m<span> </span><span class="gmail-gr_ gmail-gr_12 gmail-gr-alert gmail-gr_spell gmail-gr_inline_cards gmail-gr_run_anim gmail-ContextualSpelling gmail-ins-del" id="gmail-12" style="display:inline;border-bottom:2px solid transparent;background-repeat:no-repeat;color:inherit;font-size:inherit"><span class="gmail-gr_ gmail-gr_17 gmail-gr-alert gmail-gr_spell gmail-gr_inline_cards gmail-gr_run_anim gmail-ContextualSpelling gmail-ins-del" id="gmail-17" style="display:inline;border-bottom:2px solid transparent;background-repeat:no-repeat;color:inherit;font-size:inherit">to n</span></span>. These come up in my work sometimes, and I usually represent them with coefficient arrays ordered like this:</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">c[0]*x^0 + ... + c[n]*x^n + c[n+1]x^-m + ... + c[n+m+1]*x^-1</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Because then with negative indexing you have:</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">c[-m]*x^-m + ... + c[n]*x^n</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Still, these objects can't be manipulated as nicely as polynomials because they aren't closed under integration and differentiation (you get log terms).</div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial"><br></div><div style="font-size:small;text-decoration-style:initial;text-decoration-color:initial">Max</div>

<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Jun 30, 2018 at 4:56 PM, Charles R Harris <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:charlesr.harris@gmail.com" target="_blank">charlesr.harris@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote"><span class="">On Sat, Jun 30, 2018 at 1:08 PM, Ilhan Polat <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ilhanpolat@gmail.com" target="_blank">ilhanpolat@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>I think restricting polynomials to time series is not a generic way and quite specific. <br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>I think more of complex analysis and it's use of series. </div><span class=""><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div></div><div><br></div><div>Apart from the series and certain filter design actual usage of polynomials are always presented with decreasing order (control and signal processing included because they use powers of s and inverse powers of z if needed). So if that is the use case then probably it should go under a namespace of `TimeSeries` or at least require an option to present it in reverse.  In my opinion polynomials are way more general than that domain and to everyone else it seems to me that "the intuitive way" is the decreasing powers.</div><div><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></span><div>In approximation, say by Chebyshev polynomials, the coefficients will typically drop off sharply above a certain degree. This has two effects, first, the coefficients that one really cares about are of low degree and should come first, and second, one can truncate the coefficients easily with c[:n]. So in this usage ordering by increasing degree is natural. This is the series idea, fundamental to analysis.</div><div><br></div><div>Algebraically, interest centers on the degree of the polynomial, which determines the number of zeros and general shape, consequently from the point of view of the algebraist, working with polynomials of finite predetermined degree, arranging the coefficients in order of decreasing degree makes sense and is traditional.</div><div><br></div><div>That said, I am not actually sure where the high to low ordering of polynomials came from. It could even be like the Arabic numeral system, which when read properly from right to left, has its terms arranged from small to greater. It may even be that the polynomial convention derives that of the Arabic numerals.</div><div><br></div><div><snip></div><div><br></div><div>Chuck</div></div></div></div>
<br>______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
NumPy-Discussion mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:NumPy-Discussion@python.org">NumPy-Discussion@python.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/numpy-<wbr>discussion</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>