<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, Nov 6, 2018 at 3:55 PM Stefan van der Walt <<a href="mailto:stefanv@berkeley.edu">stefanv@berkeley.edu</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 12:11:13 -0800, Robert Kern wrote:<br>
> Popular, but quite misleading, in the same way that not every 2-dim array<br>
> is a matrix. As someone who works on tensor machine learning methods once<br>
> complained to me.<br>
<br>
Are you referring to vectors, structured arrays, or something else?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I was responding to this statement by Chuck:</div><div><br></div><div>> <span style="color:rgb(80,0,80)">I think the current popular terminology is `tensors` for `multidimensional arrays`.</span></div><div><span style="color:rgb(80,0,80)"><br></span></div><div><font color="#500050">Mostly popularized by Tensorflow. But the "tensors" that flow through Tensorflow are mostly just multidimensional arrays and have no tensor-algebraic meaning. Similarly, a 2-dim array (say, a grayscale intensity image) doesn't necessarily have a matrix-algebraic interpretation, either.</font><span style="color:rgb(80,0,80)"> </span><span style="color:rgb(80,0,80)">A 640x480 grayscale image is not a linear transformation from RR^640 to RR^480.</span><span style="color:rgb(80,0,80)"> It's just a collection of numbers that are convenient to organize as a 2D grid.</span></div><div><font color="#500050"><br></font></div><div><font color="#500050">This seems to be a pain point with some tensor methods ML researchers who have to explain their work to an audience that seems to think that Tensorflow must make their lives (and theses) easy. :-)</font></div><div><br></div></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature">Robert Kern</div></div>