<div dir="auto"><div>Rondall,</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Are you familiar with the lmfit project? I am not an expert, but it seems like your algorithms may be useful there. I recommend checking with Matt Newville via the mailing list.<div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Regards,</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Joe</div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote" dir="auto"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Fri, Jun 5, 2020, 17:00 Ralf Gommers <<a href="mailto:ralf.gommers@gmail.com">ralf.gommers@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Fri, Jun 5, 2020 at 9:48 PM rondall jones <<a href="mailto:rejones7@msn.com" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">rejones7@msn.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">





<div lang="EN-US">
<div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">Hello! I have supported constrained solvers for linear matrix problems for about 10 years in C++, but have now switched to Python. I am going to submit a couple of new routines for linalg called autoreg(A,b) and autoregnn(A,b). They work
 just like lstsq(A,b) normally, but when they detect that the problem is dominated by noise they revert to an automatic regularization scheme that returns a better behaved result than one gets from lstsq. In addition, autoregnn enforces a nonnegativity constraint
 on the solution. I have put on my web site a slightly fuller featured version of these same two algorithms, using a Class implementation to facilitate retuning several diagnostic or other artifacts. The web site contains tutorials on these methods and a number
 of examples of their use. See <a href="http://www.rejones7.net/autorej/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://www.rejones7.net/autorej/</a> . I hope this community can take a look at these routines and see whether they are appropriate for linalg or should be in another location.<br></p></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Hi Ron, thanks for proposing this. It seems out of scope for NumPy; scipy.linalg or scipy.optimize seem like the most obvious candidates. <br></div><div><br></div><div>If you propose inclusion into SciPy, it would be good to discuss whether the algorithm is based on a publication showing usage via citation stats or some other way. There's more details at <a href="http://scipy.github.io/devdocs/dev/core-dev/index.html#deciding-on-new-features" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://scipy.github.io/devdocs/dev/core-dev/index.html#deciding-on-new-features</a></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,<br></div><div>Ralf</div><div><br></div></div></div>
_______________________________________________<br>
NumPy-Discussion mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:NumPy-Discussion@python.org" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">NumPy-Discussion@python.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/numpy-discussion</a><br>
</blockquote></div></div></div>