<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 9/12/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">&quot;Martin v. L÷wis&quot;</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:martin@v.loewis.de">martin@v.loewis.de</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>&gt; I can assure you<br>&gt; that most of the documents that I work with are not in CP436 - they are<br>&gt; a combination of ASCII, ISO8859-1, and UTF-8. I would also guess that<br>&gt; this is true of many Windows XP (US-English) users. So, for me and users
<br>&gt; like me, Python is going to silently misinterpret my data.<br><br>No. It will use a different API to determine the system encoding, and<br>it will guess correctly.</blockquote><div><br>If Python reports &quot;cp1252&quot; as I expect it to, then it has not &quot;guessed correctly&quot; for Brian's documents as described above. The mistake will be harmless for the ASCII files and often for the ISO8859-1 files, but would be dangerous for the UTF-8 ones.
<br><br>&nbsp;Paul Prescod<br><br></div></div>