<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <meta content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
Nicholas Bastin wrote:
<blockquote
 cite="mid:66d0a6e10709101802t3a8f2475gcdeb180ceaaf3855@mail.gmail.com"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">As for the user-replaceable shared library part, that's up for
considerable debate.  It's unlikely that static linkage legally
creates a derivative work (that would be pretty unreasonable in
computer science terms), but it's never been tested in court, so
static linking would probably be out for distributors without a legal
department.</pre>
</blockquote>
<br>
I guess anything is debatable, but the LGPL explicitly defines programs
statically-linked with LGPL code as being "derivative works":<br>
<blockquote>
  <p><strong>5.</strong>
A program that contains no derivative of any portion of the
Library, but is designed to work with the Library by being compiled or
linked with it, is called a "work that uses the Library". Such a
work, in isolation, is not a derivative work of the Library, and
therefore falls outside the scope of this License.
  </p>
  <p> However, linking a "work that uses the Library" with the Library
creates an executable that is a derivative of the Library (because it
contains portions of the Library), rather than a "work that uses the
library". The executable is therefore covered by this License.
Section 6 states terms for distribution of such executables.<br>
  </p>
</blockquote>
I feel it's intellectually dishonest to ignore the LGPL's restrictions
on the basis that its definitions haven't been tested in court.&nbsp; You
seem to suggest that, were Python to incorporate LGPL code,
organizations which redistribute a statically-linked Python should
ignore the LGPL-induced restrictions--is that really what you mean?<br>
<br>
I for one am relatively happy with the existing Python license.&nbsp; I
would be quite irritated if Python were to incur more restrictive
licenses, whether or not they had been tested in court.<br>
<p><br>
<i>larry</i><br>
</p>
</body>
</html>