On 9/27/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Nicholas Bastin</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:nick.bastin@gmail.com">nick.bastin@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<div><span class="gmail_quote"></span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On 9/22/07, <a href="mailto:martin@v.loewis.de">martin@v.loewis.de</a> &lt;<a href="mailto:martin@v.loewis.de">martin@v.loewis.de</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt; argc/argv does not exist on Windows (that you seem to see it<br>&gt; anyway is an illusion), and if it did exist, it would be characters,
<br>&gt; not bytes.<br><br>Of course it exists on Windows.&nbsp;&nbsp;argc/argv are defined by the C<br>standard, and say what you will about Windows, but it has a conforming<br>implementation.&nbsp;&nbsp;argv exists on Windows exactly the way the C standard
<br>requires it - as an array of null terminated &quot;strings&quot;.&nbsp;&nbsp;It&#39;s left as<br>an exercise to people with more time than I to argue about the<br>definition of the term &#39;string&#39; in the C standard (since the standard
<br>itself is silent on the issue).</blockquote><div><br>The entry point of a Windows application is WinMain, not main; you can create a console-only standard C application if you&#39;d like, but its not a Windows program. Python apps are Windows programs even if they have a console attached. And the WinMain function passes the entire command line as a single char* with no breaking or parsing of any kind.
<br><br>--S<br>&nbsp;</div><br></div>