<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 26/03/2008, <b class="gmail_sendername">Nick Coghlan</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:ncoghlan@gmail.com">ncoghlan@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
I think if I come across a keyword I didn&#39;t know in a language I was<br> learning, I&#39;d look it up to find out what it means.&nbsp;</blockquote><div><br>Yes but it doesn&#39;t look like a keyword, does it? It looks like a letter of the greek alphabet to me. :-) The first time I came across lambda I looked for the definition of the variable &quot;lambda&quot; in the whole program and wondered about that strange syntax: &quot;variable x,y: x+y&quot;.<br>
<br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">Lambda calculus is a<br> well established field of mathematics, so it&#39;s a perfectly valid name<br>
 for the construct.<br></blockquote><br>In my university in Sweden lambda calculus is never taught neither in pure nor applied math. It is only a part of a course in computer science applied to linguistics. The word &quot;lambda&quot; however is&nbsp; used all over the place as an eigenvalue, or a wave length, or parameter, or Lamé coefficient in many of our courses.<br>
&nbsp;</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">So don&#39;t use it. Use a named function instead. Then it will be even more<br> of a pleasure to read, because the name you choose will tell the reader<br>
 what the function is for. You can even attach a docstring to make it<br> really obvious.</blockquote><div><br>I don&#39;t use lambda. I never ever use it. But people use it. I am talking about beginners in front of a code where lambda is used. I am also talking about a beginner writing &quot;lambda = 3.&quot; and getting a weird syntax error message.<br>
&nbsp;</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"> &gt; I thought that the upcoming of python 3000 would be a good opportunity<br> &gt; to change this name but since few or no python beginners or newcommers<br>
 &gt; are reading this mailing list I don&#39;t think that I will get a lot of<br> &gt; support here. :-)<br> <br> <br>For a long time, lambda functionality wasn&#39;t going to exist in Py3k at<br> all. It certainly isn&#39;t going to get enough care and attention to<br>
 warrant Guido expending the mental energy needed to arbitrarily choose a<br> new name, and anyone else going through the code and docs changing it.<br> <br> Python beginners and newcomers should be steered completely clear of<br>
 anonymous functions anyway.</blockquote><div><br><br>They can&#39;t. lambda is used all over the place. I&#39;m teaching python for scientific computing and I don&#39;t teach lambda but I have to tell students never to use the name &quot;lambda&quot; as a variable.<br>
<br>I also agree with the idea that the lambda construct should rather use
a keyword free syntax like &quot;x -&gt; 3*x&quot; or something of that kind.
That would be gorgeous.<br>&nbsp;</div>Sorry if I posted this in the wrong mailing list. I was not aware of the python-ideas mailing list but you will sure get messages from me over there as well. :-)<br><br>Thanks for all the responses.<br>
<br>== Olivier<br></div><br>