[Python-checkins] CVS: python/dist/src/Doc/tut tut.tex,1.130,1.131

Fred L. Drake fdrake@users.sourceforge.net
Tue, 03 Apr 2001 10:41:59 -0700


Update of /cvsroot/python/python/dist/src/Doc/tut
In directory usw-pr-cvs1:/tmp/cvs-serv1178/tut

Modified Files:
	tut.tex 
Log Message:

Make reference to the Library Reference in the "What Now?" chapter a
hyperlink.

Fix two English usage errors caught by Jan Wells:  Changed "subsequence"
to "sub-sequence" in two places, and avoid improper use of "hopefully" in
the first paragraph of the "What Now?" chapter.


Index: tut.tex
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvsroot/python/python/dist/src/Doc/tut/tut.tex,v
retrieving revision 1.130
retrieving revision 1.131
diff -C2 -r1.130 -r1.131
*** tut.tex	2001/03/13 17:56:08	1.130
--- tut.tex	2001/04/03 17:41:56	1.131
***************
*** 943,947 ****
  Of course, we can use Python for more complicated tasks than adding
  two and two together.  For instance, we can write an initial
! subsequence of the \emph{Fibonacci} series as follows:
  
  \begin{verbatim}
--- 943,947 ----
  Of course, we can use Python for more complicated tasks than adding
  two and two together.  For instance, we can write an initial
! sub-sequence of the \emph{Fibonacci} series as follows:
  
  \begin{verbatim}
***************
*** 2033,2037 ****
  the lexicographical comparison is carried out recursively.  If all
  items of two sequences compare equal, the sequences are considered
! equal.  If one sequence is an initial subsequence of the other, the
  shorter sequence is the smaller one.  Lexicographical ordering for
  strings uses the \ASCII{} ordering for individual characters.  Some
--- 2033,2037 ----
  the lexicographical comparison is carried out recursively.  If all
  items of two sequences compare equal, the sequences are considered
! equal.  If one sequence is an initial sub-sequence of the other, the
  shorter sequence is the smaller one.  Lexicographical ordering for
  strings uses the \ASCII{} ordering for individual characters.  Some
***************
*** 3911,3918 ****
  \chapter{What Now? \label{whatNow}}
  
! Hopefully reading this tutorial has reinforced your interest in using
! Python.  Now what should you do?
  
! You should read, or at least page through, the Library Reference,
  which gives complete (though terse) reference material about types,
  functions, and modules that can save you a lot of time when writing
--- 3911,3920 ----
  \chapter{What Now? \label{whatNow}}
  
! Reading this tutorial has probably reinforced your interest in using
! Python --- you should be eager to apply Python to solve your
! real-world problems.  Now what should you do?
  
! You should read, or at least page through, the
! \citetitle[../lib/lib.html]{Python Library Reference},
  which gives complete (though terse) reference material about types,
  functions, and modules that can save you a lot of time when writing