<div dir="ltr"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Wed, 6 Dec 2017 at 15:17 Victor Stinner <<a href="mailto:victor.stinner@gmail.com">victor.stinner@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi,<br>
<br>
I wrote a quick & dirty parser to compute statistics on *new* CPython<br>
core developer per year using the following page as data:<br>
<a href="https://devguide.python.org/developers/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://devguide.python.org/developers/</a><br>
<br>
2007: 15<br>
2008: 19<br>
2009: 11<br>
2010: 20<br>
2011: 12<br>
2012: 9<br>
2013: 4<br>
2014: 10<br>
2015: 2<br>
2016: 5<br>
2017: 2<br>
<br>
Compare these numbers to Stéphane Wirtel's statistics on pull requests:<br>
   <a href="https://speakerdeck.com/matrixise/cpython-loves-your-pull-requests" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://speakerdeck.com/matrixise/cpython-loves-your-pull-requests</a><br>
<br>
=> Number of active core developerson on GitHub pull requests: 27<br>
(stats from February 2017 to October 2017)<br>
(I'm not sure of the meaning of this number, it's the number of core<br>
developer who authored pull requests, I don't think that it counts<br>
core developers who only made reviews.)<br>
<br>
If you look at the size of the source code, it's still growing<br>
constanly since 1990:<br>
<a href="https://www.openhub.net/p/python/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.openhub.net/p/python/</a><br>
<br>
2007: around 783k lines<br>
2010: around 683k lines<br>
2013: around 800k lines<br>
2015: around 875k lines<br>
2017: around 973k lines<br>
<br>
The number of bugs is also constanly growing. Statistics on bugs since 2011:<br>
<a href="https://bugs.python.org/issue?@template=stats" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://bugs.python.org/issue?@template=stats</a><br>
<br>
2011: around 2500 open issues<br>
2013: around 4000 open issues<br>
2015: around 5000 open issues<br>
2017: around 6200 open issues<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Do realize that open issues is a really misleading statistic as they include enhancement requests which we historically never close unless there's zero chance we will accept such a change.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
The size of the CPython project is constantly growing as its<br>
complexity (technical debt? what is this? :-)), but the growth of core<br>
developers is slowing down.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Well, you added code to speed up Unicode encoding/decoding, right? So it's just adding stuff to keep things performant as well as new things. It's just what happens when you're willing to improve things.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I do consider that we need more people to handle the growing number of<br>
issues and pull requests, so the question is now how to find and<br>
"hire" (sorry, promote) them ;-)<br>
<br>
Maybe we have a problem with mentoring. Maybe the CPython code base<br>
became too hard to train newcomers? Maybe we are too conservative? I<br>
don't know.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think it's partially a fact that Python's popularity has increased the pool size of contributors, so lots of people grabbing individual things. This leads to less of a chance to make sustained contributions. E.g. when I became a core dev it was because I was able to grab a new issue to work on that was easy at a very regular cadence, but I don't know if I could rectify that at this point.<br></div></div></div>