[Python-Dev] Python-3.0, unicode, and os.environ

André Malo nd at perlig.de
Sat Dec 13 07:34:06 CET 2008


* Adam Olsen wrote:

> On Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 9:47 PM, André Malo <nd at perlig.de> wrote:
> > * Adam Olsen wrote:
> >> On Fri, Dec 12, 2008 at 2:11 AM, André Malo <nd at perlig.de> wrote:
> >> > * Adam Olsen wrote:
> >> >> UTF-8 in percent encodings is becoming a defacto standard. 
> >> >> Otherwise the browser has to display the percent escapes in the
> >> >> address bar, rather than the intended text.
> >> >
> >> > Duh! The address bar should contain the URL, which *is* the intended
> >> > text. The escapes are there for a reason. If I pass some octets
> >> > using percent escapes via the query string or request body, it's not
> >> > text, not even intended. It's still a collection of octets.
> >> > Translating them back (and forth when I press enter in the address
> >> > bar) is a pretty ambigious operation and therefore pretty wrong.
> >> >
> >> > The defacto standard does not exist. There's a real one instead: RFC
> >> > 2396.
> >>
> >> All the heaps of people using non-english wikipedia sites might
> >> disagree with you.  There's only, what, a few *million* pages that
> >> would be affected?
> >
> > I'm not sure what you're trying to pull here. Is that supposed to be an
> > argument? There's no page affected at all. It's a browser UI issue, not
> > a page issue.
> >
> > And even if it were interesting at all, how the URL escapes are
> > displayed in the address bar, those millions of people would favourite
> > KOI8-R or Big 5 over UTF-8 if you would ask them.
> >
> > Which leads to the exact point: The browser cannot know, nor should it
> > even. It's opaque. The only entity which needs to understand the
> > encoding of URL percent escapes in query or request body is the
> > *server* selecting the resource.
> >
> > But I'm sure I'm not telling you any news here.
>
> You're arguing that text should be an opaque entity..

No, actually I'm not. I'm arguing that escapes are opaque.

> We've wasted enough of everybody's time on this already, I'm not going
> to continue on this thread. 

Agreed.

nd
-- 
Da fällt mir ein, wieso gibt es eigentlich in Unicode kein
"i" mit einem Herzchen als Tüpfelchen? Das wär sooo süüss!

                                 -- Björn Höhrmann in darw


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