<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#330033">
    On 4/2/2012 2:40 PM, Nick Coghlan wrote:
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CADiSq7cKr4gqc8MygShzCS9hbofTySoOVDzob0BBypVPt3M8pA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">On Tue, Apr 3, 2012 at 3:44 AM, Glenn Linderman <a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:v+python@g.nevcal.com">&lt;v+python@g.nevcal.com&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre>
      <blockquote type="cite" style="color: #000000;">
        <pre wrap=""><span class="moz-txt-citetags">&gt; </span>One thing I don't like about the idea of fallback being buried under some
<span class="moz-txt-citetags">&gt; </span>API is that the efficiency of that API on each call must be less than the
<span class="moz-txt-citetags">&gt; </span>efficiency of directly calling an API to get a single clock's time.
</pre>
      </blockquote>
      <pre wrap="">No, that's a misunderstanding of the fallback mechanism. The fallback
happens when the time module is initialised, not on every call. Once
the appropriate clock has been selected during module initialisation,
it is invoked directly at call time.</pre>
    </blockquote>
    Nick,<br>
    <br>
    I would hope that is how the fallback mechanism would be coded, but
    I'm pretty sure I've seen other comments in this thread that implied
    otherwise.  But please don't ask me to find them, this thread is
    huge.<br>
    <br>
    Glenn<br>
  </body>
</html>