<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, May 1, 2013 at 2:52 PM, Georg Brandl <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:g.brandl@gmx.net" target="_blank">g.brandl@gmx.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Am 01.05.2013 23:48, schrieb Eli Bendersky:<br>
<div class="im"><br>
>     Well, my point is that you currently don't have to inherit from int (or IntEnum)<br>
>     to get an __int__ method on your Enum, which is what I find questionable.  IMO<br>
>     conversion to integers should only be defined for IntEnums.  (But I haven't<br>
>     followed all of the discussion and this may already have been decided.)<br>
><br>
><br>
> Good point. I think this may be just an artifact of the implementation - PEP 435<br>
> prohibits implicit conversion to integers for non-IntEnum enums. Since IntEnum<br>
> came into existence, there's no real need for int-opearbility of other enums,<br>
> and their values can be arbitrary anyway.<br>
<br>
</div>OK, I'm stupid -- I was thinking about moving the __int__ method to IntEnum<br>
(that's why I brought it up in this part of the thread), but as a subclass of<br>
int itself that obviously isn't needed :)</blockquote><div><br></div><div>You did bring up a good point, though - __int__ should not be part of vanilla Enum.<br><br></div><div>Eli<br></div></div><br></div></div>