<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jun 21, 2013 at 8:20 PM, Steven D'Aprano <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:steve@pearwood.info" target="_blank">steve@pearwood.info</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 21/06/13 01:35, Benjamin Peterson wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
2013/6/20 Charles-Fran├žois Natali <<a href="mailto:cf.natali@gmail.com" target="_blank">cf.natali@gmail.com</a>>:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
2013/6/20 Thomas Wouters <<a href="mailto:thomas@python.org" target="_blank">thomas@python.org</a>>:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
If the .py file is going to be wrong or incomplete, why would we want to<br>
keep it -- or use it as fallback -- at all? If we're dead set on having a<br>
.py file instead of requiring it to be part of the interpreter (whichever<br>
that is, however it was built), it should be generated as part of the build<br>
process. Personally, I don't see the value in it; other implementations will<br>
need to do *something* special to use it anyway.<br>
</blockquote></blockquote></blockquote>
<br></div>
That's not correct. Other implementations can do exactly what CPython 3.3 does, namely just use stat.py as given. Not all implementations necessarily care about multiple platforms where stat constants are likely to change.<div class="im">
<br>
<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
That's exactly my rationale for pushing for removal.<br>
</blockquote>
<br>
+1 to nixing it.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
-1<br>
<br>
Reading the Python source code is a very good way for beginner programmers to learn about things like this.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>On the other hand, it is counter-productive to learn about code that is conceptually _wrong_.</div>
<div><br></div></div></div></div>