<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Aug 11, 2014 at 8:19 PM, Nick Coghlan <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ncoghlan@gmail.com" target="_blank">ncoghlan@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Teaching users the difference between linear time operations and quadratic ones isn't about purity, it's about passing along a fundamental principle of algorithm scalability.</blockquote>
</div><br>I would understand if this was done in reduce(operator.add, ..) which indeed spells out the choice of an algorithm, but why sum() should be O(N) for numbers and O(N**2) for containers? ¬†Would a python implementation that, for example, optimizes away 0's in sum(list_of_numbers) be non-compliant with some fundamental principle?¬†</div>
</div>