<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><br class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class="">On Sep 19, 2014, at 3:31 AM, Bohuslav Kabrda <<a href="mailto:bkabrda@redhat.com" class="">bkabrda@redhat.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class="">Hi,<br class="">as Fedora is getting closer to having python3 as a default, I'm being more and more asked by Fedora users/contributors what'll "/usr/bin/python" invoke when we achieve this (Fedora 22 hopefully). So I was rereading PEP 394 and I think I need a small clarification regarding two points in the PEP:<br class="">- "for the time being, all distributions should ensure that python refers to the same target as python2."<br class="">- "Similarly, the more general python command should be installed whenever any version of Python is installed and should invoke the same version of Python as either python2 or python3."<br class=""><br class="">The important word in the second point is, I think, *whenever*. Trying to apply these two points to Fedora 22 situation, I can think of several approaches:<br class="">- /usr/bin/python will always point to python3 (seems to go against the first mentioned PEP recommendation)<br class="">- /usr/bin/python will always point to python2 (seems to go against the second mentioned PEP recommendation, there is no /usr/bin/python if python2 is not installed)<br class="">- /usr/bin/python will point to python3 if python2 is not installed, else it will point to python2 (inconsistent; also the user doesn't know he's running and what libraries he'll be able to import - the system can have different sets of python2-* and python3-* extension modules installed)<br class="">- there will be no /usr/bin/python (goes against PEP and seems just wrong)<br class=""><br class="">I'd really appreciate upstream guidance and perhaps a PEP clarification for distributions that ship both python2 and python3, but can live without python2 (and are not Arch :)).<br class=""><br class="">Thanks a lot!<br class=""></div></blockquote></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">I don’t know for a fact, but I assume that as long as Python 2.x is installed by default than ``python`` should point to ``python2``. If Python 3.x is the default version and Python 2.x is the “optional” version than I think personally it makes sense to switch eventually. Maybe not immediately to give people time to update though?</div><br class=""><div class="">
<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class="">---</div><div class="">Donald Stufft</div><div class="">PGP: 7C6B 7C5D 5E2B 6356 A926 F04F 6E3C BCE9 3372 DCFA</div></div></div>
</div>
<br class=""></body></html>