<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>[Yury Selivanov]<br>> Wow, I gave up on this example before figuring this out (and I also<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);border-right:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex;padding-right:1ex"></blockquote>> stared at it for a good couple of minutes).  Now it makes sense.  It's<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);border-right:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex;padding-right:1ex"></blockquote>> funny that this super convoluted snippet is shown as a good example<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);border-right:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex;padding-right:1ex"></blockquote>> for PEP 572.  Although almost all PEP 572 examples are questionable.<br><br>
</div><div class="gmail_quote">And another who didn't actually read the PEP Appendix.  See my reply just before this one:  yes, the Appendix gave that as a good example, but as a good example of assignment-expression ABUSE.  The opposite of something desirable.<br><br>I've never insisted there's only one side to this, and when staring at code was equally interested in cases where assignment expressions would hurt as where they would help.  I ended up giving more examples where they would help, because after writing up the first two bad examples in the Appendix figured it was clear enough that "it's a bad idea except in cases where it _obviously_ helps".<br><br>Same way,  e.g., as when list comprehensions were new, I focused much more on cases where they might help after convincing myself that a great many nested loops building lists were much better left _as_ nested loops.  So I looked instead for real-code cases where they would obviously help, and found plenty.<br><br>And I'm really glad Python added listcomps too, despite the possibility of gross abuse ;-)<br><br></div></div>