<div dir="ltr">Excuse my 'obviously', let me clarify.<div><br></div><div>The following alphabet is reversable:</div><div>for encode: {0 : 'a', 1, 'b'}</div><div>for encode/decode: {0: 'a', 1: 'b', 'a':0, 'b':1}</div>
<div><br></div><div>You can have 'a' and 'A' coexist, but the encode will have only one option.</div><div>for encode: :{0 : 'a', 1, 'b'}</div><div><div><div>for encode/decode: {0: 'a', 1: 'b', 'a': 0, 'b': 1, 'A': 0, 'B': 1}</div>
<div><br></div><div>So one could say the encoding alphabet is the canonical representation. The encoding alphabet is actually alphabet_dict[0],..., alphabet_dict[base - 1].</div></div><div><br></div></div><div><div class="gmail_quote">
On Wed, Sep 16, 2009 at 10:34 AM, Arnaud Delobelle <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:arnodel@googlemail.com">arnodel@googlemail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
2009/9/16 Yuvgoog Greenle <<a href="mailto:ubershmekel@gmail.com">ubershmekel@gmail.com</a>>:<br>
[...]<br>
<div class="im">> The only problem with {'A': 10, 'a': 10} is that it's not reversible. If we<br>
> wantted to encode, 10, what should be used, A or a?<br>
<br>
</div>Obviously, either  :)<br>
<br>
--<br>
<font color="#888888">Arnaud<br>
</font></blockquote></div><br></div></div>