<div dir="ltr"><div><br></div><div><div>On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 4:46 PM, Gerald Britton <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:gerald.britton@gmail.com">gerald.britton@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:</div><div class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0.8ex; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-left-style: solid; padding-left: 1ex; ">
I can't imagine why I'm still commenting on this thread, since there<br>is no chance that Python will remove the "else" from for/while or put<br>conditions on it, but here is an example of a use that has no break<br>
statement:<br><br>for i, j in enumerate(something):<br> # suite<br> i += 1<br>else:<br> i = 0<br><br># i == number of things processed<br><br></blockquote><div><br></div></div></div><div>Sorry, there must be some typo in your code. The "i" is always 0 after the loop unless you break.</div>
<div><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div>>>> for i, j in enumerate(range(10)):</div><div>...     i +=1</div><div>... else:</div><div>...     i = 0</div><div>...</div><div>>>> i</div><div>0</div>
<div>>>></div><div><br></div><div>Also, why would one increment the enumeration index "i" by hand?</div><div><br></div></div></div></div>