<br>On several occasions I have run into code that will do something like the following with a multiline string:<br><br><br><blockquote style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">
<font face="courier new,monospace">def some_func():<br>    x, y = process_something()<br><br>    val = """<br><xml><br>  <myThing><br>    <val>%s</val><br>    <otherVal>%s</otherVal><br>
  </myThing><br></font></blockquote><blockquote style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote"><font face="courier new,monospace"></xml><br>
""" % (x, y)<br><br>    return val<br></font></blockquote><div><br>To me, this is rather ugly because it messes up the indentation of some_func(). Suppose we could have a multiline string, that when started on a line indented four spaces, ignores the first four spaces on each line of the literal when creating the actual string?<br>
<br>In this example, I will use four quotes to start such a string. I think the syntax for this could vary though. It would be something like this:<br><br><blockquote style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">
<font face="courier new,monospace">def some_func():<br>    x, y = process_something()<br>    <br>    val = """"<br>    <xml><br>      <myThing><br>        <val>%s</val><br>        <otherVal>%s</otherVal><br>
      </myThing><br>    </xml><br>    """" % (x, y)<br><br>    return val</font><br></blockquote><div><br>That way, the indentation in the function would be preserved, making everything easy to scan, and the indentation in the output would not suffer.<br>
<br><br>What do you all think?<br> </div></div>