<div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Feb 9, 2012 at 9:00 PM, C. Titus Brown <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:ctb@msu.edu">ctb@msu.edu</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On Thu, Feb 09, 2012 at 04:02:34PM -0800, Guido van Rossum wrote:<br>
> Sadly, it's quite frequent that works really well in an educational setting<br>
> shouldn't be recommended in a professional programming environment, and<br>
> vice versa. I'm not sure how to answer this except by creating, maintaining<br>
> and promoting some wiki pages aimed specifically at instructors.<br>
<br>
</div>Perhaps I am brainfried ATM, but I cannot imagine what you are talking about<br>
here.  Do you have any examples you can share that illustrate what you mean?<br></blockquote><div><br>Simplest example: many educators seem delighted with Python 3 because it solves a bunch of beginner's pitfalls, and their students learn in a greenfield situation. (Though this is not the case for Massimo.) Professionals OTOH don't seem to like Python 3 because it means they have to change a pile of software that took them a decade (and an army of programmers) to create.<br>

<br>Educators also often give their students a simple library of convenience functions and tell them to put the magic line "from blah import *" at the top of their module (or session). Again something that most professionals loathe, but it works well for the first steps in programming -- certainly better than the Java approach "copy these ten lines of gobbledygook [the minimal "hello world" in Java] into your file, don't ask what they mean, and above all be careful not to accidentally edit any of them".<br>

<br>OTOH when educators want their students to install some 3rd party package it is often something hideously complex like pygame, rather than something simple and elegant like WebOb or flask.<br></div></div><br>-- <br>--Guido van Rossum (<a href="http://python.org/~guido">python.org/~guido</a>)<br>