+1 for the URL in the exception. Well in all exceptions<div><br></div><div>Bringing the language into the 21st century.</div><div>Great entry points for learning about the language.</div><div><br></div><div>Whilst google provides an excellent service in finding documentation, it seems that a programming language has other methods of defining entry points for learning, being a complex but (mostly) deterministic thing. So exceptions with URLs. The URLs point to kind of "knowledge base wiki" sorts of things where the "What is your intent/usecase" can be matched up with the deterministic state we know the interpreter is in.</div>
<div><br>With something like encodings, which can be happily ignored by someone until poof, suddenly they just have mush, finding out things like "Its possible printing the string to the screen is giving the error", and "There are libraries which guess encodings" and "latin-1" is a magic bullet can take many many days of searching.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Also it may be possible, from this perspective, to show ways that the developer can gather more deterministic information about his interpreter's state to narrow down his intent for the Knowledge Base (e.g. if its a print statement that throws the error, its possible the program doesnt have any encoding issues, except debugging statements)</div>
<div><br></div><div>The encoding issue here is a great example of this because of the complexity and mobility of encodings (i.e. they ve changed a lot). There must be other good examples which can fireup equally strong and informative discussion on "options" and their limitations and benefits.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Id be very interested in formalising the idea of a "KnowledgeBase Wiki thing", maybe there already is one...</div>