<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=us-ascii"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On Sep 8, 2012, at 6:02 AM, Nick Coghlan <<a href="mailto:ncoghlan@gmail.com">ncoghlan@gmail.com</a>> wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; ">The thing I don't like is that the current display flat out lies about</span><br style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; ">the sequence contents - it displays a terminal constant ("..."),</span><br style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; "><span style="font-family: Helvetica; font-size: medium; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; display: inline !important; float: none; ">rather than a clear marker that a recursive loop was detected.</span></blockquote></div><br><div>It's more of an equivocation than a flat-out lie ;-)</div><div><br></div><div>It is an equivocation because "..." is legitimately used</div><div>for multiple purposes (in English text for "and so on ...",</div><div>in long established use in Python to denote recursive reprs,</div><div>in doctest as a placeholder for elided result text, and in</div><div>its newest role as the Ellipsis terminal constant).</div><div><br></div><div>It seems to me that the first three roles are well-established</div><div>and are reasonably consistent with one another.    Further,</div><div>each of those roles an important task.</div><div><br></div><div>In contrast, the new role as a terminal constant for an</div><div>Ellipsis singleton is brand-new, not very important,</div><div>and doesn't even have a clear semantic role (what it is</div><div>"supposed" to mean?).</div><div><br></div><div>Changing the first three uses just so it won't conflict with the last</div><div>seems like the tail wagging the dog.</div><div><br></div><div>I agree Steven that this isn't a problem worth solving.</div><div><br></div><div>As Alexander pointed-out, the ... punctuation can be used in two</div><div>distinct ways inside doctests (as part of expected output or as</div><div>a placeholder for elided content).  A consequence is that </div><div>there won't be a reliable automated way to convert existing </div><div>doctests for a new notation for recursive reprs. </div><div><br></div><div>ISTM that changes which break tests are worse than other</div><div>changes because the process of upgrading from one Python</div><div>version to the next is so heavily dependent getting existing tests</div><div>to pass.  The tests are your safety net during upgrades -- breaking them</div><div>makes upgrading less palatable.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Raymond</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></body></html>