<div dir="ltr"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 10:34 PM, Mike Graham <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:mikegraham@gmail.com" target="_blank">mikegraham@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 4:27 PM, Ram Rachum <<a href="mailto:ram.rachum@gmail.com">ram.rachum@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Hi everybody,<br>
><br>
> Today a funny thought occurred to me. Ever since I've learned to program<br>
> when I was a child, I've taken for granted that when programming, the sign<br>
> used for multiplication is *. But now that I think about it, why? Now that<br>
> we have Unicode, why not use  ?<br>
><br>
> Do you think that we can make Python support  in addition to *?<br>
><br>
> I can think of a couple of problems, but none of them seem like<br>
> deal-breakers:<br>
><br>
> - Backward compatibility: Python already uses *, but I don't see a backward<br>
> compatibility problem with supporting  additionally. Let people use<br>
> whichever they want, like spaces and tabs.<br>
> - Input methods: I personally use an IDE that could be easily set to<br>
> automatically convert * to  where appropriate and to allow manual input of<br>
> . People on Linux can type Alt-. . Anyone else can set up a script that'll<br>
> let them type  using whichever keyboard combination they want. I admit this<br>
> is pretty annoying, but since you can always use * if you want to, I figure<br>
> that anyone who cares enough about using  instead of * (I bet that people<br>
> in scientific computing would like that) would be willing to take the time<br>
> to set it up.<br>
><br>
><br>
> What do you think?<br>
><br>
><br>
> Ram<br>
<br>
Python should not expect characters that are hard for most people to<br>
type.</blockquote><div><br></div><div><span style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:12.800000190734863px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">No one will be forced to type it. If you can't type it, use *.</span></div>

<div><span style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:12.800000190734863px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><br></span></div><div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Python should not expect characters that are still hard to<br>
display on many common platforms.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div style="color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:12.800000190734863px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">We allow people to have unicode variable names, if they wish, don't we? So why not allow them to use unicode operator, if they wish, as a completely optional thing?</div>

<div class="yj6qo ajU" style="outline:none;padding:10px 0px;width:22px;margin:2px 0px 0px;color:rgb(34,34,34);font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:12.800000190734863px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><span style="background-color:transparent"></span></div>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
I think you'll find strong opposition to adding any non-ASCII<br>
characters or characters that don't occur on almost all keyboards as<br>
part of the language.<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
Mike<br>
</font></span></blockquote></div><br></div>