<p dir="ltr">On Oct 13, 2012 6:45 AM, "Devin Jeanpierre" <<a href="mailto:jeanpierreda@gmail.com">jeanpierreda@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
> On Fri, Oct 12, 2012 at 10:41 PM, Steven D'Aprano <<a href="mailto:steve@pearwood.info">steve@pearwood.info</a>> wrote:<br>
> > If I were designing a language from scratch today, with full Unicode support<br>
> > from the beginning, I would support a rich set of operators possibly even<br>
> > including MIDDLE DOT and  MULTIPLICATION SIGN, and leave it up to the user<br>
> > to use them wisely or not at all. But I don't think it would be appropriate<br>
> > for Python to add them, at least not before Python 4: too much effort for<br>
> > too<br>
> > little gain. Maybe in another ten years people will be less resistant to<br>
> > Unicode operators.<br>
><br>
> Python has cleverly left the $ symbol unused.<br>
><br>
> We can use it as a quasiquote to embed executable TeX.<br>
><br>
>   for x in xrange($b \cdot \sum_{i=1}^n \frac{x^n}{n!}$):<br>
>     ...<br>
></p>
<p dir="ltr">I hope this was in jest because that line of TeX for general programming made my eyes bleed.</p>
<p dir="ltr">A PEP for defining operators sounds interesting for 4.0 indeed. Though it might be messy to allow a module to meddle with the python syntax. </p>
<p dir="ltr">Perhaps instead I would like it if all operators were objects with e.g. special __infix__ methods.</p>
<p dir="ltr">Yuval</p>