<div dir="ltr">On Sun, Oct 14, 2012 at 1:03 PM, Antoine Pitrou <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:solipsis@pitrou.net" target="_blank">solipsis@pitrou.net</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 21:48:59 +1100<br>
<div class="im">Steven D'Aprano <<a href="mailto:steve@pearwood.info">steve@pearwood.info</a>> wrote:> -1 on iteration over the children. Instead, use:</div><div class="im">
><br>
> for child in p.walk():<br>
>      ...<br>
><br>
> which has the huge benefit that the walk method can take arguments as<br>
> needed, such as the args os.walk takes:<br>
><br>
> topdown=True, onerror=None, followlinks=False<br>
<br>
</div>Judging by its name and signature, walk() would be a recursive<br>
operation, while iterating on a path isn't (it only gets you the<br>
children).<br>
<div class="im"><br></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Steven realized what currently happens and was suggesting doing it differently.</div><div><br></div><div>Personally I really dislike the idea that</div><div><br>

</div><div>    [i for i in p][0] != p[0]</div><div><br></div><div>It makes no sense to have this huge surprise.</div></div></div>