<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/10/29 Mark Hackett <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:mark.hackett@metoffice.gov.uk" target="_blank">mark.hackett@metoffice.gov.uk</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im">On Monday 29 Oct 2012, Richard Oudkerk wrote:<br>
> Writing (short messages) to a pipe also<br>
> has atomic guarantees that can make having multiple writers perfectly<br>
> reasonable.<br>
><br>
> --<br>
> Richard<br>
><br>
> _______________________________________________<br>
> Python-ideas mailing list<br>
> <a href="mailto:Python-ideas@python.org">Python-ideas@python.org</a><br>
> <a href="http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-ideas" target="_blank">http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-ideas</a><br>
><br>
<br>
</div>Is that actually true? It may be guaranteed on Intel x86 compatibles and Linux<br>
(because of the string operations available in the x86 instruction set), but I<br>
don't thing anything other than an IPC message has a "you can write a string<br>
atomically" guarantee. And I may be misremembering that.<br>
  </blockquote><div><br></div><div>x86 and x64 string operations aren't atomic. Only a few, selected, instructions can be LOCK prefixed (XCHG is the only one that doesn't require it, since it's always locked) to ensure an atomic RMW memory operation.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Regards,</div><div>Cesare</div></div>