<br>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 9:15 PM, Greg Ewing <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz" target="_blank">greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">Bruce Leban wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
If you change the semantics so that it either (1) it always always includes a trailing / or (2) it includes a trailing slash if the two paths have it in common, then you don't have the weirdness that in this case it returns a slash and in others it doesn't. I am slightly inclined to (1) at this point.<br>


</blockquote>
<br></div>
But then the common prefix of "/a/b" and "/a/c" would be "/a/",<br>
which would be very unexpected -- usually the dirname of a path is<br>
not considered to include a trailing slash.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Although less confusing than the current behavior :-) </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


<br>
The special treatment of the root directory is no weirder than it<br>
is anywhere else. It's already special, since in unix it's the<br>
only case where a trailing slash is semantically significant.<br>
(To the kernel, at least -- a few command line utilities break this<br>
rule, but they're screwy.)</blockquote><div><br></div><div>That's reasonable. Perhaps it's sufficient to document it clearly.</div><div><br></div><div>--- Bruce</div><div> </div></div>