<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 11/21/12 2:38 PM, Nick Coghlan
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CADiSq7d1sCytBav-dehkaPsVo--nYrbBCpPfkMkiLDxP6j6AMQ@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Nov 21, 2012 at 7:50 PM, Philipp
        Hagemeister <span dir="ltr"><<a moz-do-not-send="true"
            href="mailto:phihag@phihag.de" target="_blank">phihag@phihag.de</a>></span>
        wrote:<br>
        <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
          .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
          <div class="im">On 11/21/2012 04:27 AM, Nick Coghlan wrote:<br>
            > Or install them all in a single directory, add a
            __main__.py file to that<br>
            > directory and then just pass that directory name on the
            command line<br>
            > instead of a script name. The directory will be added
            as sys.path[0] and<br>
            > the __main__.py file will be executed as the main
            module (If your<br>
            > additional application dependencies are all pure Python
            files, you can even<br>
            > zip up that directory and pass that on the command line
            instead).<br>
          </div>
          I'm well-aware of that approach, but didn't apply it to
          dependencies,<br>
          and am still not sure how to. Can you describe how a
          hypothetical<br>
          helloworld application with one dependency would look like?
          And wouldn't<br>
          one sacrifice the ability to seamlessly import from the
          application's<br>
          code itself.<br>
        </blockquote>
        <div><br>
          One directory containing:<br>
          <br>
            runthis/<br>
                 __main__.py<br>
                     (with content as described for your main.py)<br>
                 lxml<br>
                 myapp<br>
          <br>
          Execute "python runthis" (via a +x shell script if you
          prefer). Note the lack of -m: you're executing the directory
          contents, not a package. You can also bundle it all into a zip
          file, but that only works if you don't need C extension
          support (since zipimport can't handle the necessary step of
          extracting the shared libraries out to separate files so the
          OS can load them.<br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Hi Nick,<br>
    <br>
    This would actually be very nice if we could go this far! ;-)<br>
    Maybe with some Ramdisk support or something.<br>
    A problem might be to handle RPath issues on the fly.<br>
    I've actually learnt about this when working on the pyside setup,<br>
    was not aware of the problem, before.<br>
    <br>
    Do you think it would make sense for me to put time into this?<br>
    <br>
    cheers - chris<br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Christian Tismer             :^)   <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto:tismer@stackless.com"><mailto:tismer@stackless.com></a>
Software Consulting          :     Have a break! Take a ride on Python's
Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 121     :    *Starship* <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://starship.python.net/">http://starship.python.net/</a>
14482 Potsdam                :     PGP key -> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://pgp.uni-mainz.de">http://pgp.uni-mainz.de</a>
phone +49 173 24 18 776  fax +49 (30) 700143-0023
PGP 0x57F3BF04       9064 F4E1 D754 C2FF 1619  305B C09C 5A3B 57F3 BF04
      whom do you want to sponsor today?   <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.stackless.com/">http://www.stackless.com/</a></pre>
  </body>
</html>